Study on educational support to newly arrived migrant children (NAMS) According to a new study commissioned by the European Commission, newly arrived migrant children (NAMS) are more likely to face segregation and end up in schools with fewer resources.This leads to under-performance and a high probability that the children will drop out of school early. The study examines national policies in support of newly arrived migrant children in 15 countries which have seen significant recent immigration flows: Austria, Belgium (Dutch-speaking community), the Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the UK. The study's analysis highlights the importance of school autonomy and of a holistic approach to educational support for new migrant children; this includes linguistic and academic support, parental and community involvement, and intercultural education. It says schools should avoid segregation as well as early selection of pupils in terms of ability, as this may disadvantage migrant children who are adapting to a new language. The study also underlines the need to improve monitoring and collection of statistics on access, participation and performance of migrant pupils and students. The study's findings reflect statistics from the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which tests the skills and knowledge of 15 year olds. The OECD found that, in 2010, 25.9% of foreign born pupils in Europe abandoned education or training prematurely compared to 13% of pupils born in the country. Find out more: http://ec.europa.eu/education/more-information/reports-and-studies_en.htm#migrant

Study on educational support to newly arrived migrant children (NAMS)

According to a new study commissioned by the European Commission, newly arrived migrant children (NAMS) are more likely to face segregation and end up in schools with fewer resources.This leads to under-performance and a high probability that the children will drop out of school early.

The study examines national policies in support of newly arrived migrant children in 15 countries which have seen significant recent immigration flows: Austria, Belgium (Dutch-speaking community), the Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the UK.

The study’s analysis highlights the importance of school autonomy and of a holistic approach to educational support for new migrant children; this includes linguistic and academic support, parental and community involvement, and intercultural education.

It says schools should avoid segregation as well as early selection of pupils in terms of ability, as this may disadvantage migrant children who are adapting to a new language. The study also underlines the need to improve monitoring and collection of statistics on access, participation and performance of migrant pupils and students.

 

The study’s findings reflect statistics from the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which tests the skills and knowledge of 15 year olds. The OECD found that, in 2010, 25.9% of foreign born pupils in Europe abandoned education or training prematurely compared to 13% of pupils born in the country.

 

Find out more: http://ec.europa.eu/education/more-information/reports-and-studies_en.htm#migrant